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PHOTOGRAPHS: MEET OUR STARS!

MEET OUR SNAKES LIZARDS SPIDERS & MINIBEASTS

 

Meet the stars of Meet The Beasts & choose who you want to meet ...

SNAKES
LIZARDS
TARANTULAS
SCORPIONS
ARTHROPODS (SNAILS)
INSECTS
MILLIPEDES

 

 

SNAKES

 

Boa Constrictor Imperator (Common Boa) - Meet Geoff The BoaTM

Still only young, Geoff, our Common Boa (Boa constrictor imperator) is growing into a beautiful, gentle, large snake. Native of Latin America, especially Brazil, these do not grow as large as their more famous counterparts, Boa constrictor constrictor but they are extremely placid & seem to enjoy being handled, making them an ideal introduction to touching & holding a snake.  Geoff is so popular with our audiences that he has his own Geoff The BoaTM Face Book Page where he writes about how he sees the World & his experiences.

[Common Boa Constrictor Imperator - Meet Geoff]

 

Western Hognose Snake - Meet Wesley

A small snake who's convinced he's an Anaconda! Wesley, the Western Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus) is loved by everyone he meets and is great for introducing people to snakes for the first time. Always highly entertaining; always very friendly.

[Wesley the Western Hognose Snake (Heterodon nasicus)]

 

Chihuahua Mountain Kingsnake - Meet Eric

Eric, our vividly coloured Chihuahua Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis pyromelana knoblochi) is a fast-moving, gentle snake who always draws an "Ooooh!" from the crowds!

Eric the Chihuahua Mountain Kingsnake (Lampropeltis pyromelana knoblochi)]

 

Blair's Grey Banded Kingsnake - Meet Lucy

Lucy, our Blair's Phase Grey Banded Kingsnake (Lampropeltis alterna) is probably our most patient snake. With a beautiful temperament and beautiful colours she is a very popular guest.

[Lucy, Our Blair's Phase Grey Banded Kingsnake (Lampropeltis alterna)]

 

California Kingsnake - Meet George

George, our Banded California Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula californiae) doesn't make very many trips out as he is rather bad tempered, not only towards people but towards himself! He's still a beautiful snake and we love him.

[Meet george, Our Banded California Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula californiae)]

 

Baird's Rat Snake - Meet Cheese

Cheese, our Baird's Rat snake (Pantherophis bairdi) is now sociable enough to take out to events! She is a beautiful snake who although still quite active, is now happy to be handled. Wonderful bronze & grey make her a very popular member of Meet The Beasts' family.

Meet Cheese, Our Baird's rat Snake (Pantherophis bairdi)]

 

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

LIZARDS

 

Leopard Geckos - Meet Gertrude & Paper

Gertrude & Paper are our Leopard Geckos (Eublepharis macularius), two small, friendly lizards. Gertrude is not good at shedding her old skin so has a rather blunt tail and a few claws missing. Our Leopard Geckos always get the 'Aaaah!' factor.

[Meet Gertrude, One of Our Leopard Geckos (Eublepharis macularius)]

[Meet Paper, Our Other Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius)]

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

TARANTULAS

PLEASE NOTE: We do allow close-up viewing of our tarantulas but for safety reasons (irritant hairs & biting potential) we DO NOT allow them to be handled.

All of our tarantulas are captive-bred & have not been taken from their natural habitats.

 

Curly Hair Tarantula  - Meet Samba

Samba, our Curly Hair Tarantula (Brachypelma albopilosum) has a permanent bad hair day, but is very gentle. She's still growing. Originating from South America, these spiders flick their urticating hairs, which can cause skin irritation, as a means of defence. Low venom potency.

[Meet Samba, Our Adult Female Curly Hair Tarantula (Brachypelma albopilosum)]

 

Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula - Meet Cuica

Cuica, our Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula (Aphonopelma seemanni) is less predictable than the previous two! Notice the distinctive skeleton-like markings on her legs. Low venom potency but skittish and a bit unpredictable.

[Meet Cuica, Our Adult Female Costa Rican Zebra tarantula (Aphonopelma seemanni)] 

 

Greenbottle Blue Tarantula

The Greenbottle Blue Tarantula (Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens) is a beautiful spider, highly sought after for its vivid colours. They are rather skittish & likely to suddenly dash at high speed if disturbed. Rather unpredictable with low venom toxicity. Our male is now mature & approaching the end of his life, but he is still very pretty.

[Meet Our Young Greenbottle Blue tarantula (Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens)]

 

Philippine Orange Tarantula

Meet our young Philippine Orange Tarantula (Selenobrachys philippinus). A beautiful bright orange Asian spider with a highly aggressive temperament, they are also very fast; certainly not one for handling. Highly predictable but with low venom toxicity. Ours is still young (but already defensive).

[Meet Our Adult Female Philippine Orange tarantula (Selenobrachys philippinus)]

 

Cobalt Blue Tarantula

The Cobalt Blue Tarantula (Haplopelma lividum) is a beautifully coloured Asian spider renowned for its evil disposition. Spending most of its time living in deep burrows, this highly aggressive spider will attack & bite repeatedly if provoked & will show signs of aggression without provocation. Males lose their beautiful blue colouration at their adult moult, turning a plain brown colour. Highly unpredictable but with low venom toxicity.

[Meet Our Adult Female Cobalt Blue Tarantula (Haplopelma lividum)]

 

Orange Baboon Tarantula

The Orange Baboon Tarantula (Pterinochilus murinus) does not have the nickname 'OBT' (Orange Bitey Thing) for nothing. Another defensive but very colourful spider, these spin extensive tunnels from silk. Ours demonstrates none of the aggressiveness for which OBTs are known, but it is extremely fast. Venom is known to be quite potent which, although not dangerous, causes unpleasant, painful, burning swelling. This, combined with its defensive behaviour mean that it is best kept in a secure enclosure. Another great spider to look at.

[Our Adult Orange Baboon tarantula (Pterinochilus murinus)]

 

Indian Ornamental Tarantula

The Indian Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria regalis) is a highly prized species. Beautiful grey/blue/purple upper markings combine with vivid yellow bands on the underside of its forelegs. This is another fast, defensive arboreal species. Containing a potent (though not fatal venom) this spider is best kept in a secure container. A beautiful exhibit & fascinating pet (when it emerges from it's tree trunk).

[Our Adult Female Indian Ornamental tarantula (Poecilotheria regalis)]

 

Fringed Ornamental Tarantula

The Fringed Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria ornata) is a large species, with a leg-span of up to 10-inches (25cm). Beautiful green, grey & yellow 'lightning bolt' upper markings combine with vivid yellow bands on the underside of its forelegs. This is another fast, defensive arboreal species with one of the most potent (though not fatal) venom this secretive spider is most active at night. Spectacular specimen.

[Our Adult Fringed Ornamental tarantula (Poecilotheria ornata)]

 

Gooty Ornamental Tarantula

The Gooty Ornamental Tarantula (Poecilotheria metallica), named after the region of India where it is now a threatened species, is a highly sought after, spectacularly coloured tree spider. Smaller than the Fringed Ornamental, these spiders make-up in colour what they lack in size! Intense, rich blues, contrast bright yellow upper leg-joint markings, whilst underneath the bright yellow bands on its forelegs serve as a warning when the spider is threatened. Another fast, defensive tarantula with a significant (though not fatal) venom is truly spectacular.

[Our Adult Female Gooty Ornamental tarantula (Poecilotheria metallica)]

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

SCORPIONS

 

Vietnamese Forest Scorpion

Meet Steve our Vietnamese Forest Scorpion (Heterometrus laoticus). She is quite fast but non-aggressive & relatively non-venomous, originating in the forests of Vietnam. Growing to between 5 & 7-inches (12.5-17.5cm) they are a large, powerful arachnid, using their large pincers to catch their prey (typically insects) & then their sting to immobilize the prey whilst eating it.

[Meet Our Vietnamese Forest Scorpion (Heterometrus laoticus)]

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

ARTHROPODS (SNAILS)

 

Giant African Land Snail - Meet Speedy

Meet Speedy, one of our Giant African Land Snails (Achatina fulica). These slow, gentle arthropods feed on fruit & vegetables, which they eat with great speed. They also like cuttlebone which is a source of calcium for their shells. Growing to a huge size, they also breed faster than rabbits!

[Meet our young Giant African Land Snail (Achatina fulica]

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

INSECTS

 

Giant Hissing Cockroaches

Originating from Madagascar, the Giant Hissing Cockroaches (Gromphadorhina portentosa) are very successful at surviving. They are 'detritivores' feeding on waste vegetation & meat (though they are fed mainly fruit & vegetables in captivity). When disturbed they hiss (hence their name) & they can grow to 3-inches (7.5cm) in length.

[One of Our Female Giant Madagascan Hissing Cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa)]

 

Death's Head Cockroach

[One of Our Sub-Adult Death's Head Cockroach]

This is the young nymph stage of the Death's Head Cockroach (Blaberus craniifer), so-called because of a black spot behind the head of the adult which is said to resemble the shape of a skull. The adults (below) have wings although they cannot fly and the move very quickly. Unlike the Giant Hissing Cockroach, the Death's Head Cockroach cannot climb up smooth plastic and glass, so escape is less frequent!

[One of Our Many Death's Head Cockroaches (Blaberus craniifer)]

 

 

African Fruit & Flower Beetles/Chafers

Over the past year we have been developing our range of beautifully coloured African Fruit & Flower Beetles/Chafers.

Their life-span as an adult beetle is relatively short, living for only 3-6 months, but their vivid colours make them a spectacular exhibit & fascinating study.

Our hatched species currently include:

African Flower Beetles/Chafers:

Eudicella trilineata interruptefasciata

[Some of Our Eudicella trilineata interruptefasciata African Flower Beetle (chafer)]

 

African Fruit Beetles: 

Eudicella aethiopica (Large African Fruit Beetle)

[Our Eudicella aethiopica giant african fruit beetle]

 

African 'Jewel' Beetles: 

Chlorocala africana africana (Green Jewel Beetle)

[One of Our Chlorocola africana africana African Green Jewel Beetle]

 

Smagdethnes africana oertzeni (Purple Jewel Beetle)

[One of Our Smagdethnes africana oertzeni African Purple Jewel Beetle]

 

 

Please Note: Due to the relatively short life span of African Fruit Beetles our stock will change from time to time. Please ask for details.

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

MILLIPEDES

 

Madagascan Fire Millipede

Madagascan Fire Millipedes (Aphistogoniulus corralipes) are so-called because of their intense fire-orange colour with bright yellow legs. These small millipedes feed on detritus (decaying plant & animal matter). Unlike centipedes, millipedes do not inject venom into their prey, but they do produce a strong smelling secretion on their skin which makes them taste very unpleasant to potential predators.

[Meet our Madagascan Fire Millipedes (Aphistogoniulus corralipes)]

 

Please Note: Due to the relatively short life span of some millipedes our stock will change from time to time. Please ask for details.

 

Why not have a look at some videos of our animals here

 

 

[Meet The Beasts is Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) Approved Enhanced Disclosure]Stuart, Matthew & Rebecca have Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)/ Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) Enhanced Disclosures. 

 

 

 

 

 

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[Meet The Beasts is Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) Approved]Stuart, Matthew & Rebecca have Criminal Records Bureau (CRB)/ Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) Enhanced Disclosures. 

 

[Meet The Beasts is a member of The Police Community Clubs of Great 
Britain Citizenship Business Club]Meet The Beasts is pleased to be a member of The Police Community Clubs of Great Britain Citizenship Business Club

 

 

[PDF]Meet The Beasts reptile handling events
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MORE INFORMATION

Dr Stuart Wood
c/o Meet the Beasts
31 Burder Street
Loughborough
Leics
LE11 1JH

Telephone + 44 1509 553362
Mobile: + 44 7814 628123
e-mail: dr.stu@ntlworld.com

 

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